Episode 4

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Published on:

5th Mar 2024

80's Fashion Fever: Insights from a Visually Impaired Thrifter

Explore the vibrant world of 80's fashion from a unique perspective as we sit down with Rebecca Collins, a visually impaired thrifter. From navigating the op-shops to identifying authentic labels, discover valuable insights and tips for incorporating 80's fashion into your wardrobe.

Guest bio:

Rebecca Collins is a visually impaired thrifter, with a passion for shopping 80s pre-loved clothing and creating inspiration through her head-to-toe Instagram " Outfit of the Day '' stories. Bec started reselling on Poshmark through the pandemic - to clean out her wardrobe and create a side hustle after recuperating from major eye surgery - to today where Bec sells a curated 80s vintage collection at suburban markets, through Instagram and Facebook, and in selected vintage shops. Bec is looking to take her thrifting to the next level by working with the Blind and Low vision (BLV) community, to help educate and empower people that live with a visual disability, to help them understand that fashion is accessible for all.

Connect with Bec:

@aninsightfulhaul on Instagram

Mentioned in this episode:

About the show:

This is ´╗┐Reloved Radio: Sustainable Fashion Stories, the fortnightly show that brings you inspiring stories from guests who are making a positive impact in the sustainable fashion space.

Want to know the BEST places to shop secondhand online in Australia? Download this EPIC list for free!

Join the Reloved conversation on Instagram.

Credits:

Music: 'Old Leather Sneakers' by PineAppleMusic

Transcript
Bec:

I can't always wear glasses, so my vision tends to fluctuate.

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:

I know my limitations.

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I always carry a magnifying glass with

me and I've got some really cutesy

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little traveling ones that fit into my

handbag . All my friends just, they, we

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have to laugh at it 'cause they're like,

for a blind person, you do pretty well.

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Chryssius: Hey, Relovers!

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Welcome back to another

episode of Reloved Radio.

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I'm your host, Chryssius Dunn, and today

we have a super interesting guest joining

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us, someone with a unique vision and

a passion for all things 80s fashion.

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Now, you know, we're all about

sustainable style and the stories

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behind our preloved treasures.

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Today's guest embodies that spirit.

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She's not just an 80s fashion curator

and reseller, but also a remarkable

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individual who navigates the world of

thrift stores, op-shops, and vintage

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markets with a unique perspective.

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With a keen eye for authentic pieces

and a commitment to sustainability,

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she's curated a collection that

tells a story beyond fashion.

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You might know her from the journey

she shares on Instagram under

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the handle @aninsightfulhaul.

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So grab your favourite drink, settle in,

and let's dive into the world of authentic

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80s fashion with Rebecca Collins.

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Welcome to the show, Bec!

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Who doesn't love the 80s?

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I feel there's a lot people out there

that don't love the 80s, and I do get

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a little bit devastated sometimes that

they don't have the same passion for

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the 80s as what I do, but I try and

put it out there as much as I can.

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Love that.

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Tell us how you got started

as an 80s fashion reseller?

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Bec: Interestingly, I didn't

really grow up with loving op-shops.

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Um, I am a maximalist.

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I always have been, but I kind of got

into it about 10, probably eight to

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ten years ago, a friend of mine said,

"I'm going to hormone school and I've

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just learned all about hormones and

I think you should get on board."

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And I was like, "What do you mean?

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I've got absolutely no idea

what you're talking about."

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And it started with Alexx Stuart, who...

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she does Low Tox Life.

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She started as a podcast but basically,

it was talking about how you live with

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a, a level of toxicity in your life.

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And my journey actually

started with clean beauty.

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So I got onto Nourished Life and Irene

Falcone and learning that story which

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then went into like Sarah Wilson with

I Quit Sugar, and then Clare Press with

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Wardrobe Crisis and, and learning about

ethical fashion and being educated.

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And that was probably all through

a lot through Covid as well, that I

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re-listened to a lot of this, but that's

kind of where it all STARTED started.

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And then I got into the whole

secondhand shopping, I guess from

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the ethical fashion movement.

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I hated going into op-shops when I

was growing up, but then realised

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the connectivity between going into

the op-shops and actually buying

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preloved clothes because we just

already had too many clothes in the

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world as it was, becoming the eco

warrior that I did, all of that was

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really impressed upon me, I suppose.

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And yeah, I just started going

into op-shops, then I started

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finding little bits of treasure.

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I started adapting my style, because I

wasn't conforming to what everybody was

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wearing every single day, mass produced.

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I started looking at clothes in a

completely different way, and I don't

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know why the 80s specifically called

out to me, but you know, I was born in

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the seventies, so I grew up in the 80s.

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So for me it was all about Melanie

Griffith's "Working Girl" you know, her

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hair and shoulder pads, and listening to

Laura Branigan and, Olivia Newton-John

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"Physical", we would do aerobics

and wear those outfits, you know?

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So I guess that's where

it kind of transformed.

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And I never looked back.

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I thought, wow, I'm so into

this and there's gotta' be

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a niche of people out there.

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So I started sourcing, I

started buying it, and then I

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was wearing a lot of it myself.

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And then just working through that style

and then thinking, oh, this is great.

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Like, surely there's gotta' be more

people that think that this is a good

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idea and like this kind of clothing.

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So then you start seeing people out

in the street wearing bits and pieces,

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and you're like, yeah, there they are.

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There they are.

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I can spot them.

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Chryssius: And just to clarify for

our listeners, when we're talking

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about 80s clothing, the pieces that

you were starting to be attracted

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to, like, are we talking leg

warmers and Lycra or something else?

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Bec: Hey, I've never stopped

loving leg warmers to be honest.

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I think for me the biggest

thing is probably shoulder

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pads, first and foremost.

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I'm lucky to say that 'cause I'm quite

tall and rather broad-shouldered,

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I feel like, once I started wearing

things again with shoulder pads and

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I'm talking, the bigger, the better.

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I just found that my

whole silhouette changed.

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I also really love massive earrings.

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I also wear very bright lipstick.

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Always do.

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I can't wear a lot of eye makeup because

of my eyes and what's going on with them.

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So I really don't wear

a lot of eye makeup.

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So lipstick, not hair so

much, but yeah, shoulder pads.

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I love a blazer and I love a coat, so I

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Chryssius: Kindred spirits.

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Bec: Right.

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And then I started getting into dresses,

which I've never been a dress wearer.

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And then I think it was also a

combination of what I started to see

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through the op-shops, what I deemed

as "treasures" through the op-shops.

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And also, power suits, things like

that, that I just started seeing

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in a whole different light that

really just ignited this passion.

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And I was like, "Oh my God!"

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Like I, I feel like I'm so old school,

but I'm okay with that, you know?

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So yeah, that's kind of where it happened.

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But yeah, the, the op shopping

itself is, is a really big thing.

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'Cause I, I just actually can't

go into a normal shop now.

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You can't find 80s in a normal shop.

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Oh, what I was gonna' say was also

with 80s was, going into the shops

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and finding it, but also finding

the right people on Instagram.

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People get shown up to you all the time

and you're like, oh my God, there are

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other people out there that are into this.

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So you know, to coin the phrase,

"finding your tribe" online and then

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just starting the conversations with

people and, and seeing what they were

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sporting, whether they were reselling

or whether they were just doing

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outfit of the day or whatever it was.

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You just go, "Oh my God!

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Yeah, that person loves

that dress as much as I do!"

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Chryssius: Mm-Hmm.

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So when you're out there how do you find

authentic 80s pieces for your collection?

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Bec: I will take any opportunity to

pretty much source from anywhere.

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It could be a tin shed for all I care,

garage sales, vintage shops, anywhere

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and everywhere that sells something

that is preloved or secondhand.

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I actually love going in, I probably

shouldn't say it is a bit of, retail

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therapy, but yes, I do wholeheartedly

believe in retail therapy.

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From personal experience and my own

lived experience and family and friends,

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if we're all having a bit of a down

moment, we kind of pick our socks

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up - or leg warmers - and runners,

and we'll be like, let's just put our

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gear on and run down to the local oppy

and see what's going on down there.

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Because everyday changes in an op-shop, as

the listeners and yourself would be aware.

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But you know, some of these places

you just, could go daily, you could

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visit daily and there's always

something different and there's

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always someone else in the store.

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There might be a new volunteer

that you can have a chat to.

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But yeah, so I don't really

look at it as sourcing, per se.

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I would say it's the thrill of the find.

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Chryssius: Oh, absolutely.

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I will say I've never found leg warmers...

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...in of the op-shops.

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I'm disappointed now.

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Now that

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Bec: I know it's gonna'

be on our list, right?

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Chryssius: I'm putting it on the list.

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As someone with low vision,

is that what you would say?

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Bec: Yeah.

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Chryssius: How do you navigate

the stores, and the markets?

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Does hold you back in any way?

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Bec: Yeah.

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Look, it's been tough.

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So I've had the condition since birth,

and I've had three corneal transplants.

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I was born with corneas that were

shaped like footballs, and yours

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would be shaped like basketballs.

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They got cut off and I've

had three donors sewn on.

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They don't always work and I'll

get to a point where I won't

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be able to do that anymore.

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I had my first transplant

at 16, so I am now 50.

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I just turned 50 last week.

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The procedure that I had had done at

that time is pretty much no longer.

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The older you get, the expiration on the

corneal transplants is a lot quicker.

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So yes, it has been a journey up and down.

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And I can't always wear glasses,

so my vision tends to fluctuate.

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But I have to say, and all my

friends just, they, we have to laugh

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at it 'cause they're like, for a

blind person, you do pretty well.

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So yes, it is difficult, but I think

because I'm so used to, let's say, looking

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for things now, I, I know my limitations.

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It does depend on the store or

the shop that I'm going into,

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how they set up the store.

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So some shops can be easier based purely

on how they've oriented their stock.

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The more stock that they have, the

more difficult it is 'cause I feel

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like there's just too much to see.

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I always carry a magnifying glass with

me and I've got some really cutesy little

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traveling ones that fit into my handbag.

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When I'm checking the garments, I

check everything from head to toe.

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For me as a reseller, it has

to be about quality assurance

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as well and quality control.

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So I won't pick up things like if there's

missing threads or if there's sun fade

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or there's stains, or there's rips.

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I won't always pick up those things,

but, you know, when people go into an

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op shop, they might determine within 20

minutes, oh yeah, this is it for me, and

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I've found something, or they haven't.

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Where for me, I take a little bit

longer because I am so particular

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about what I curate anyway.

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I also take that extra time for

the quality control element to it.

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I can usually tell by

the vibe of the shop.

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I can tell by the colour element to it.

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There's some op-shops, like, I'm pretty

sure it's Vinnie's, that colour block.

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I do like..

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Chryssius: They do.

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Bec: Yeah, I like a colour block element,

but I don't like everything in one colour.

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So for me, that's just a wash of colour.

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It's like everything's in

red, everything's in blue.

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I like, especially for 80s, you never

really went with block colour, right?

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So in the 80s there's a lot of neon,

there's a lot of print, there's a

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lot of animal print, polka dots,

abstract, you know, patterns.

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Everything was polyester then.

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So going via a tactile element,

like touch and feel, that's a

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huge element to what I do as well.

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I can literally run my fingers across

the clothing and pick out instantly

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what feels good, what doesn't.

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Because I've gone through it so many

times, I do feel like I can instantly

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pick up things and know whether

they're gonna' be of quality, but

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to check them out, yeah, I will go

from head to toe and look at all the

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detail that incorporates that item.

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Chryssius: Do you have any tips for

incorporating those amazing 80s pieces

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that you find into contemporary outfits?

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Bec: Yeah, I think you probably

should start with one item.

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So I think the easiest, and it may

be a seasonal thing too, but I think,

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I guess coat or jacket or blazer.

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Not to say that because that is my

first and foremost and it is the

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first rack that I will always go to.

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I will seek out a shop just to

find that rack first and foremost.

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I think because coats, jackets, and

blazers, they might change a little

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bit in terms of the silhouette wearing

them, but if you can get the really

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good quality ones that are wool

or cashmere, or that have a blend.

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They don't have to have

shoulder pads, obviously.

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I prefer them.

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But you know, it depends

on whether you like colour.

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So you, you know, you might

buy a jade green coat.

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I found an emerald green coat for

$6 in a Vinnies and it probably

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took me two hours to brush it down,

steam it, do all of that, which, you

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know, we can get into a bit later.

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But for a $6 coat that turned out to

be an absolute jewel in the closet,

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that was probably one of the first

things that I was like, yeah, I'm

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actually gonna' insert more colour.

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'Cause being a Melbournite,

Melbourne is grey.

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I've always had an element of colour

in my wardrobe, but being from

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Melbourne, it's always been black,

neutral, grey, white, you know.

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That IS the Melbourne uniform.

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It is a Melbourne uniform.

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Yeah, for true.

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So, then inserting something like

a cobalt blue or a, a jade green or

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a emerald green or I don't know, a

canary yellow coat into the wardrobe.

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Also a blouse, a jumper and a scarf.

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They're my main elements.

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A blouse, you can, especially an

80s blouse with a pussy bow like...

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yeah, I do really love a pussy bow.

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And I have several.

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They're probably the key things

I would put in straight away.

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And everybody can wear a jumper.

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So, 80s was about oversized, windcheaters.

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Chryssius: Knits with cats on them.

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Bec: Oh yeah.

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Can you see?

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Oh my God.

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So...

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Chryssius: Oh no.

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Is that what you're wearing?

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No way!

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Bec: Oh my God, so this was my Mum's

from the 80s, just a white windcheater

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and it's got cats on the front and

then it's got their faces at the

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front and their bums on the back.

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Chryssius: That was totally unplanned.

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I could not see what was on your jumper.

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So for everyone listening Bec

has a jumper over her shoulders.

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Very on trend, but I couldn't see what

it was, but when I think of 80s jumpers,

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I do think of knits with cats on them.

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Or

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Bec: Yeah.

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Chryssius: We've seen that 80s fashion

is definitely making a comeback.

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Bec: Yeah.

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Chryssius: Why do you believe

that it continues to appeal to

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today's fashion enthusiasts?

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What is it about it?

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Bec: There's, there's quite a few

elements to that answer, I think.

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No one wants to be held back

anymore, everyone wants to express

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themselves in some way or another.

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And I think fashion is one of

the, the main elements to do that.

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Not specifically 80s, but I.

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I don't know, 80s just seemed to be like

the total fun decade, 80s and nineties.

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You know, their clothing

was just super fun.

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When I think back to the sixties and

seventies, like I was born 74, but,

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and I wasn't in the sixties too, you

know, but all of that fashion I see.

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It was nowhere near as vibrant

or as exciting as the 80s, you

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know, and then Stranger Things,

there's always that connection.

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Stranger Things with the 80s, and

that was a big thing when I did

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some work with the Garage Sale Trail

campaign, and I think it was either

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last year or the year before they

did, um, they took it back to the 80s.

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So I just thought that was hilarious.

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They made that connection.

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I was like, oh my God, that's true!

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Chryssius: I feel like I need to

go back and watch it again now just

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to look at what people are wearing.

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Bec: Yeah.

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Chryssius: When you're out

there and finding these beautiful

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pieces, how are you ensuring,

first of all, the authenticity?

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Because there's a lot of

copycats that are coming out.

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At the moment that are, you know,

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sort of, Yeah.

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Yes, exactly.

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And also the quality, because

obviously the quality is going to

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be a completely different league

to what's being out there now.

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Bec: Yeah, I always check

the label, to be honest.

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I, I look at colour, I can look

at an item and I can touch it.

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I can feel it.

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But the first, first thing I'll

do is even holding onto the hanger

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before I've even touched the item.

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I will look at the label.

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And the labels are always

indicative of the era.

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There's always the labels, then there's

the buttons, then it's how they're sewn.

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As in the garment itself, not the buttons.

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But buttons are a huge element

because you just don't get buttons

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like that, that you would previously.

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So yeah, the labels are really

important and they always

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dictate to me how old they are.

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Buttons, a hundred percent.

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Or the accents on any garment.

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So whether that's a metallic thread

through it, whether it is a certain

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pattern, you don't get patterns.

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With today's clothing, they're all just

prints there's no real pattern to them.

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They're not taking into account

a lot of historical patterns

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that were made back in the day.

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And in terms of longevity, like

of keeping them too, I just,

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I never keep them in plastic.

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A lot of people that resell, buy stuff

and then they put 'em in plastic and I

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think they're already polyester, which

can't be recycled, which is a fossil fuel.

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Right.

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So at the end of the day the

polyester that we're wearing

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is a fossil fuel, it's an oil.

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We're already wearing that.

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We don't need to put plastic on plastic.

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So you just have to be mindful of

washing them on a gentle cycle.

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Spraying with vodka because

that gets the smell out of it.

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And , depending where it's come

from, if there's moths that you

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need to keep at bay, you freeze it.

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So you freeze things for a couple

of weeks and then pull them out.

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But yeah, just to get that musty

smell away, I would spray everything

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with vodka and then I steam everything

out, 'cause steaming at that heat and

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that level is also antibacterial.

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Chryssius: I can't live

without my steamer.

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Bec: Oh, I know.

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I actually find it very therapeutic.

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I would rather steam

something than cook dinner.

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Anytime anyone says, oh, I need

to have this ironed, I'd be like,

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yeah, I'll steam it for you.

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Don't worry.

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Give me two seconds.

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Yeah.

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So I think in terms of the quality

and keeping the quality, so

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the authenticity is one thing.

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It's about looking at the labels and

checking all those details and how it's

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tailored, how it's made, the fibre that

they've used, but then keeping it and then

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making sure that you keep it as quality.

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Um, never put in plastic.

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And a lot of my resellers will hate me

for saying that, but never put in plastic.

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I hang everything up and I just have

racks in my garage that I just, I, I try

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to keep a very small inventory at any one

time so I can kind of rotate it out there.

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Chryssius: What's your

selling platform of choice?

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So you say you don't keep

too much stock on hand.

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So is it Instagram, is

it in in person markets?

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I know you do a few markets.

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Bec: Yes, I love the markets.

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I love the in real life markets because

it means I've got an opportunity

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to talk to people about the clothes

and where they've come from.

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And even if it's not my story to

tell, it's somebody's story to tell.

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So anything I source or anything that

I obtain or find, I usually like

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to try and wear it myself, or I will

fit it on my body so I know how it

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looks and what it looks like, and

then I can talk to people about it.

355

:

So, yes, markets are key.

356

:

I also find that with markets, you

talk to a lot of the stall holders and

357

:

you've got similar values and similar

mindsets and your neighbours in the

358

:

stalls, they're a wealth of information.

359

:

Especially if you're selling vintage

and I don't know about every single

360

:

vintage market that's out there, somebody

might know of a vintage market and my

361

:

particular genre or my niche, which

is 80s, they might go, oh, your stuff

362

:

would really do really well at this

store or at this place, or whatever.

363

:

So yeah, first and foremost, markets,

just because they're a wealth of untapped

364

:

knowledge and just the comradery of it.

365

:

I think the bonding and

the comradery of it.

366

:

I also, I don't do a lot online anymore

as you know, like we were both in

367

:

the Poshmark game and that lasted

for so long at a really good level.

368

:

And then it didn't.

369

:

Etsy, same-same.

370

:

They give you a lot of support

to start with, but then it's

371

:

all about making it on your own.

372

:

But online platforms for

me don't really cut it.

373

:

It's also about having low vision

and I have to then spend time

374

:

taking the photos, editing, filters.

375

:

I can't tell you from one

filter to another filter.

376

:

I've got absolutely no idea.

377

:

So a lot of that that's at my fingertips

is actually very difficult, to manage.

378

:

I also can't use my phone on the run.

379

:

I don't have enough vision

to allow me, even just to do

380

:

a text message or whatever.

381

:

I don't drive either.

382

:

So that's a really hard thing

to maintain when you have to

383

:

refresh your stock all the time.

384

:

So I kind of pick places where

I know I could probably get

385

:

to via train if I needed to.

386

:

But usually I'll enlist

in someone to drive me.

387

:

So, whether that's a cousin or a friend

or whatever, and then I just kind of book

388

:

them in and say, "Hey, I've gotta' go and

refresh my stock at blah, blah, blah."

389

:

And it's the same with the markets.

390

:

Like I always have to have someone with

me at the markets to be able to drive

391

:

me and support me and, that's all.

392

:

Yeah, that's kind of what I do.

393

:

Chryssius: Whatever works.

394

:

It's always interesting to see what

is working best for other people.

395

:

Bec: Yeah.

396

:

Chryssius: I know you touched on this

very briefly when we were talking

397

:

about authenticity, um, labels.

398

:

Are there any particular brands or

labels from the 80s that you would

399

:

recommend people look out for?

400

:

What are your favourites?

401

:

Bec: There's way too many that I

know of and as soon as I see that

402

:

label, I will pick it up and it's

like nine outta 10 times I will

403

:

buy it just because of the label.

404

:

Some personal favourites are

Beaujolais for mostly blouses.

405

:

Because, well, they're a pussy bow

406

:

or got a Yeah, course.

407

:

Or they've got, a great

colourway or a pattern.

408

:

So instantly when I see them,

they've got some quirkiness to them.

409

:

They might have a really

lovely button cuff.

410

:

They might have a really nice

shoulder pleat or a little, puff

411

:

sleeve or something like that.

412

:

So I tend to go for

Beaujolais as a blouse.

413

:

A One, Pelaco, they're really good.

414

:

Anything that's A One and Pelaco,

they're not in production anymore.

415

:

Mr.

416

:

K for eveningwear.

417

:

The old Jacqueline Eve

is today's Jacqui E.

418

:

But the old school, Jacqueline Eve,

everything about Jacqueline Eve, it

419

:

was the cut, it was the buttons, it

was the pockets, it was the scalloping

420

:

around the bottom of the blazer.

421

:

It was the shoulder pads, the

print, everything, Jacqueline Eve.

422

:

Katie's back in the day.

423

:

Target...

424

:

Geoff Bade was a really good brand.

425

:

Anthea Crawford, Sportsgirl...

426

:

Dolina.

427

:

There's just so many.

428

:

The original Sportscraft, like

Sportscraft and Sportsgirl.

429

:

I remember getting my very

first denim jacket in the 80s.

430

:

Sportsgirl.

431

:

I still have it.

432

:

It's in my wardrobe.

433

:

But yeah, I don't wear it.

434

:

I actually don't wear it.

435

:

I think I've worn it half a dozen times.

436

:

It's something I, I'll

never be able to part with.

437

:

Chryssius: I remember getting

my first Sportsgirl T-shirt in

438

:

the nineties, early nineties.

439

:

Bec: Yeah.

440

:

And Esprit back in the day, and

Miss Shop Myer, I've still got,

441

:

I think I've got a couple of

things Miss Shop Myer, still.

442

:

Chryssius: Do you work in

a corporate environment?

443

:

Bec: Not anymore.

444

:

Chryssius: I wanted to know if you

wear these beautiful pieces to work!

445

:

Bec: Oh no.

446

:

And God, it's so funny because I've

always been known for my outfits.

447

:

Like everyone's always been

like, "What's Bec wearing today?"

448

:

Even in my corporate days, I used

to be an events director and work in

449

:

events and travel, and I was always

a power suit wearer, but I never wore

450

:

Cue because I could never afford it.

451

:

So it wasn't until that later on when

I was on the disposable income that I

452

:

started getting into Cue and Veronika

Maine and kind of elevated that game.

453

:

Even to this day, I mean, they're not

as fast fashion as now, but as soon as

454

:

they went offshore, for me that was it.

455

:

It was like, okay, well they've

almost become commercialised now.

456

:

So I've been on the journey for say, 10

years, but the actual style change has

457

:

only been in the last four or five years.

458

:

I actually stopped working, just

prior to lockdowns and everything.

459

:

Because my vision was deteriorating and

I couldn't retain the job that I had.

460

:

I was managing a bunch of people and it

was just progressively getting worse.

461

:

So I had to kind of bite the

bullet and go, all right,

462

:

corporate's not for me anymore.

463

:

And then it didn't matter 'cause I went

on a holiday for my birthday and came back

464

:

and we're all, we basically in lockdown.

465

:

I like, oh, I, I don't need to make

any drastic career changes right now.

466

:

And then I just probably got

really full on into it and just

467

:

listened to everything, podcasts...

468

:

Chryssius: What else were we

gonna' do while we're in lockdown?

469

:

Bec: Exactly.

470

:

And then you'd be going down

those rabbit holes on YouTube or,

471

:

Instagram or something like that.

472

:

And then that was really what propelled

me to really adapting my style and kind

473

:

of clearing out my closet and thinking,

why do I need eight different black

474

:

blazers or, you know, mind you, I did

do a reel on that and I actually started

475

:

explaining how sometimes you do need

extra black blazers 'cause they come

476

:

in all different sizes and shapes and

silhouettes and for different things.

477

:

Um, But yeah, through that whole

period, like you just become

478

:

mindful of what you've got.

479

:

Chryssius: Side note: have you seen.

480

:

"What We Wore"?

481

:

Bec: Yeah.

482

:

With Celeste Barber, that one?

483

:

Chryssius: Yes!

484

:

That has a really good piece

in there about Cue, actually.

485

:

Bec: Yeah, it's a really,

really interesting history about

486

:

how they redefined themselves

and developed their style.

487

:

And, you know, people don't even know that

they've got the sister companies of Dion

488

:

Lee and Veronika Maine, and then they had,

Cue In The City, they were their first to

489

:

go offshore and then get made in China.

490

:

So you had Cue as a mainstream and

they had Cue In The City, which

491

:

was made for the younger woman.

492

:

Then you had Veronika Maine,

which was for the older woman.

493

:

So then their styles changed for, it

wasn't as much of a v-neck, it was

494

:

a little bit higher, the skirt was

a little bit lower than the knees.

495

:

There were these subtle changes

through their designing process,

496

:

on how it affected and how it

changed with a woman's body.

497

:

It's just, it's fascinating.

498

:

It's fascinating.

499

:

I find any Australian brand, that's

another thing with the 80s for me,

500

:

it's Australian brands and "Made

in Australia", and that's one of

501

:

the key elements other than labels.

502

:

So you'd still find it on not

just a brand label, but on the

503

:

actual, um, the care tags on it.

504

:

If it says, if it gives you

your measurements and then it

505

:

also says "Made in Australia".

506

:

It's a, it's a key piece.

507

:

It's gotta' be, it's a key piece.

508

:

Chryssius: It's a piece of gold.

509

:

Bec: Yeah, that's it.

510

:

Chryssius: I reckon we've got

time for one more question.

511

:

Bec: Okay.

512

:

Chryssius: Have you noticed any

particular 80s trends or styles

513

:

that are making a comeback?

514

:

Bec: Yeah, well, shoulder pads are, I

definitely think they are, they're not as

515

:

out there as I would like personally, but

I can sport them myself, with confidence.

516

:

So I feel like I can

take a hit for the team.

517

:

That's fine.

518

:

And shoulder pads especially,

'cause just, it just changes the

519

:

whole structure of an outfit.

520

:

I think hair, so there's

elements of big hair coming back.

521

:

Chryssius: Miley Cyrus.

522

:

Bec: Well, I was gonna' say like,

if anybody hasn't seen it, yes.

523

:

The Miley Cyrus in her, like Tina

Turner, look for the Grammys.

524

:

That just, that was everything for me.

525

:

Um, mullets, I hate mullets, detest.

526

:

DE-TEST.

527

:

Never liked them back then, and I don't

like them now, they are terrible.

528

:

There's loaded makeup...

529

:

80s was very heavy on the colour scheme

of electric blue eyeshadow or bright

530

:

red lips and put that all together.

531

:

Bright red cheeks, bright red lips,

electric blue eyeshadow, and heavy,

532

:

heavy black eyeliner, you know?

533

:

Just the rouging of cheeks

is just like killer.

534

:

When you see like Linda Evangelista

in some pics or whatever, you just

535

:

look at it and go, oh my goodness.

536

:

But loaded makeup is still a thing.

537

:

It's just a, a different way

of applying it, I suppose.

538

:

Um, and I think what really has come back

as a resurgence is probably the colours.

539

:

So I feel like it's a good nod back

to the 80s, like what we have now by,

540

:

by those of us who keep pushing it.

541

:

I mean, I get looks all the time.

542

:

'Cause you can have "80s

wear" and "80s wear", right?

543

:

But I'm very, like, quintessential

80s, the neon and the classic wear,

544

:

where I know people that do the

80s as well, but they're all about

545

:

the sequins and the evening wear.

546

:

So if you look at mine versus someone

else's, it could be that the key

547

:

differences might be sequins and,

um, mine's, a lot of occasional

548

:

wear and a lot of that corporate,

because that was me as a person too.

549

:

I lived through all of that.

550

:

So yeah, there are different

elements of the 80s, but there's

551

:

just such a big nod back to it.

552

:

I can't really say why people

do, but that's, that's my

553

:

opinion on why I think it is.

554

:

I just wanna get it out there.

555

:

I wanna push it.

556

:

I wanna just be like,

come and buy all my shit.

557

:

I've got heaps.

558

:

I've got such good things.

559

:

The stuff that you find is

outrageous, and I'm like, it's key.

560

:

It's like venting.

561

:

That was something I

didn't mention before.

562

:

"Venting" is when an

item has a slit in it.

563

:

So if you are wearing a skirt or a

blazer and you have that little slit

564

:

at the back, you go to a shop now,

you will not find venting on anything.

565

:

And if you do, it's stitched together.

566

:

No one knows that that's just

holding the garment in place until

567

:

you snip it and then you let it

open because it falls against your

568

:

waistline or your butt or whatever

it is to, you know, fit you better.

569

:

So many things like that are lost.

570

:

Chryssius: Yeah, I've done that.

571

:

So awkward.

572

:

I'm like, oh, excuse me while I

just snip the back of my blazer.

573

:

Bec: Yeah, exactly.

574

:

When I was listening to Claire Press

and all of her stuff, you know, going

575

:

into it, when I started doing it for

myself, I would actually start looking

576

:

up, what's the terminology for this?

577

:

Like embroidery versus applique

versus scalloping versus, you

578

:

know, venting or jacquard, paisley.

579

:

I, I didn't know paisley.

580

:

I thought paisley was floral.

581

:

I thought it was the same thing.

582

:

No, it's not, everybody.

583

:

It's not.

584

:

And then working out the difference

between a chevron print, houndstooth,

585

:

dogstooth, tweed, boiled wool.

586

:

It's just, it's a quagmire

of what's out there.

587

:

But I love that whole process, that

whole process of learning about it.

588

:

Chryssius: It's an

educational process for sure.

589

:

Once you start op-shopping, and

not even just as a reseller, but

590

:

just even when you're op-shopping

for yourself, it is educational.

591

:

You learn a lot.

592

:

And listening to podcasts, of course.

593

:

Bec: And listening to podcasts.

594

:

Chryssius: All right, so three

really important things that I can

595

:

take away from this conversation:

"venting" - I didn't know what that was.

596

:

I need to buy more vodka.

597

:

And I definitely need a bigger freezer.

598

:

Thank you very much.

599

:

Before you go, Bec, I would love to

know, what is your Best Bargain Brag?

600

:

So something that you have found

secondhand, whether it be an

601

:

op-shop or market, a tin shed,

wherever that's, your favourite

602

:

or the most unusual, or craziest.

603

:

Tell us.

604

:

Bec: Look, I do like something that

has more of a, an attachment of sorts.

605

:

That is from a, I like to say as

a descendant or as an heirloom, I

606

:

find that resonates more with me

than just obtaining it through an

607

:

op shop or something like that.

608

:

I probably have three things in

my wardrobe that I will never get

609

:

rid of, even if I never wear them.

610

:

I have my Mum's Perri Cutten, it was a

cropped bolero kind of cropped jacket.

611

:

The colour is like a goldy,

quilted kind of jacket with

612

:

this beautiful metallic thread.

613

:

That would be one key thing that I'll

probably keep and I may or may not wear.

614

:

The other one was from my great

aunt, and it was a tomato red

615

:

wool coat from the seventies.

616

:

The brand is Solo.

617

:

That's another brand I did not mention,

but one of my all absolute faves.

618

:

Anything from Solo is key because of

the tailoring, the accents, the wool.

619

:

It's just gonna' be a gorgeous piece.

620

:

And then, the other thing, funnily

enough, was donated to me from

621

:

one of our Poshmark friends.

622

:

I don't know whether she would want to

be named, so we will leave it at that.

623

:

But she leave it as anonymous.

624

:

But we had just been having this

random discussion about Glomesh

625

:

and I cannot believe that Glomesh

has not come up once on this whole

626

:

Chryssius: Oh my God.

627

:

Bec: discussion.

628

:

I know we might have to go back and

retape it all over again, 'cause

629

:

I haven't even told you about my

Glomesh collection, my obsession

630

:

with it, like absolute obsession.

631

:

And we had had this conversation

and she said to me, "I'm trying to

632

:

sell a Glomesh purse in my closet."

633

:

And I was like, yeah.

634

:

She goes, "You know what?

635

:

I'm not even gonna' sell it.

636

:

I'm just gonna' gift it to

you because it was my Mum's."

637

:

And her Mum's still alive.

638

:

And she said, "It's my

Mum's, it was from the:

639

:

I just don't have someone

that I think would appreciate

640

:

this as much as you would.

641

:

I want to give this to you."

642

:

And I said, "I'll take it.

643

:

I will take her and I will treasure her."

644

:

So she arrived in her original box with

the original authenticity and everything,

645

:

and I wrote her Mum a card and I said,

oh my God, she will be loved forever.

646

:

And she's in my collection.

647

:

And she was one of my first pieces

of the collection of my Glomesh.

648

:

Chryssius: Oh my God, that

is such a beautiful story.

649

:

Bec: Yeah.

650

:

Yeah.

651

:

And I'll pull her out.

652

:

I pull it out and then I'll, I'll use it.

653

:

And I always know where it's come from.

654

:

Those kind of pieces are more like

they're my sentimental keepsake pieces.

655

:

I can thrift anything and you can

always find a really good find.

656

:

So it is something like that.

657

:

Chryssius: For anyone listening, you

can just go to the Highlights on the

658

:

Reloved Radio Instagram, and you'll

be able to see those pieces there.

659

:

Bec: Perfect.

660

:

Chryssius: And that just

about wraps it up for today.

661

:

Thank you so much, Bec.

662

:

You've been a pleasure to chat to.

663

:

Can you tell everyone

where they can find you?

664

:

Bec: Yeah, so I'm on Instagram and

Facebook, but for the life of me, I

665

:

don't even know how to use Facebook.

666

:

So find me on Instagram @aninsightfulhaul.

667

:

" Insightful" was on my play of words

for being a low vision person, because

668

:

I've virtually had no sight or I don't

have any sight, but "An Insightful

669

:

Haul" because all of my hauls are

insightful and they're always curated.

670

:

So you can be sure that you'll find

some kind of unique piece and whether

671

:

I have it on my grid or not, if you're

looking for something you can always

672

:

send me messages and I can kind of

do some sourcing for you if you need.

673

:

And just keep an eye on my Stories, 'cause

I'm always down at the Seddon op-shop and

674

:

finding pieces and putting them out there.

675

:

No money comes to me for those.

676

:

They go straight back

to Epilepsy Foundation.

677

:

I just like to be the in-betweener,

the broker, that can get it out there.

678

:

Chryssius: And for our listeners

that are local to Ballarat,

679

:

you are coming in March...

680

:

Bec: 23rd of March I'll be at

the BWC Op Shop and Vintage Sale.

681

:

Chryssius: At Barkly Square.

682

:

Bec: Yeah.

683

:

10 to one.

684

:

Chryssius: I'll be there.

685

:

Bec: Yeah.

686

:

Good.

687

:

I'll find you some bits and pieces and go,

this is what you need in your wardrobe.

688

:

Chryssius: Oh, I'll be there.

689

:

I'll be all for it, believe me...

Show artwork for Reloved Radio: Sustainable Fashion Stories

About the Podcast

Reloved Radio: Sustainable Fashion Stories
Be inspired by the individuals who are not only transforming wardrobes but also paving the way for a planet-friendly fashion revolution. Tune in every second Tuesday to discover how these incredible stories of secondhand style, sustainable fashion, upcycling, rewearing and reselling are reshaping the narrative of our closets... and, in turn, our world.

About your host

Profile picture for Chryssius Dunn

Chryssius Dunn

Wife. Mother. Op-shops. Re-wearing. Anti-fast fashion. Decaf coffee. Cat videos. Train surfing. Nude skydiving. What? Oh, I was just listing words.